Endometriosis pain holding you back?

You may be eligible for a clinical trial.
A soft and flexible ring, placed inside the vagina, which contains a new medication is being studied to treat pain from endometriosis.

About the Study
This study will compare three different doses of the study medication to a placebo in treating your pain. The study medication is called quinagolide and is released slowly from the vaginal ring. The placebo vaginal ring looks just like the ring with quinagolide but does not have any study medication in it. This way we can tell if changes in your pain and safety are related to the study medication.

If you meet the needs of the study, you will be randomly given (like flipping a coin) one of three different doses of quinagolide or placebo. You and the study doctor/staff will not know what ring you are given.

You have a 75% (three out of four) chance of getting the study medication and a 25% (one out of four) chance of getting the placebo.

The vaginal ring does not have latex. The study medication or placebo will release slowly over 35 days. The study medication (quinagolide) works by sticking to dopamine receptors on cells in the body, like the body’s own dopamine. Dopamine is important in the nervous system for attention, mood, and feeling pain.
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Am I Eligible?
You may be able to participate in this study if you have regular menstrual cycles (24-35 days), are at least 18 years old, have not reached menopause, and are not pregnant or trying to get pregnant. You must have moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis.
There are other requirements that you must meet to join this clinical study. The staff at the research center will help decide if you should participate.

To participate, you will take some medical tests to see if you meet the needs of the trial. If you decide to join, you will be in the study for seven months with at least 11 visits to the study site. You will be paid for your time and travel.

The study has three parts:
• Screening – four or five study visits over two to three menstrual cycles to monitor your symptoms and health to find out if this study is a good fit for you.
• Study treatment – You will receive the vaginal ring (study medication or placebo) for four menstrual cycles and will visit the study site about six times.
• Follow-up – You will have a final visit after the last vaginal ring is removed.

You may stop participating in the study for any reason at any time, and it will not affect your medical care now or in the future.


Why Should I Participate?
By participating in the trial, you will help collect information about how well the study medication works and how safe it is. You may also have pain relief by being in the trial.
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